Jean
Y'all reading any?

I'm reading Ready Player One. I like it so far, but it's pandering to me in a way that makes me feel uncomfortable. Like it knows I'm an easy lay.
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Infinitus Corsair
Jean wrote:
Y'all reading any?

I'm reading Ready Player One. I like it so far, but it's pandering to me in a way that makes me feel uncomfortable. Like it knows I'm an easy lay.


I mean, you probably knew that when you picked it up, right? There's nothing wrong with a little popcorn if that's what you're in the mood for.
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Jean
Infinitus Corsair wrote:


I mean, you probably knew that when you picked it up, right? There's nothing wrong with a little popcorn if that's what you're in the mood for.

Yeah, that's exactly what this book was. A nicely salted and buttered bag of popcorn.

Now transitioning from Ready Player One to Notes from Underground [smile]
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Jean
Does anybody want to be my Goodreads friend [biggrin]
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YARN
Jean wrote:
Y'all reading any?

I'm reading Ready Player One. I like it so far, but it's pandering to me in a way that makes me feel uncomfortable. Like it knows I'm an easy lay.


Well, it is youth lit, right?


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Jean
YARN wrote:


Well, it is youth lit, right?



Ha.

No, it isn't.
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Jean
Notes from Underground is an appropriately upsetting deep dive into the psychology of a self-defeatist that I think a lot of people here could benefit from reading (myself included). It's good to see your darkest thoughts and inclinations articulated and enacted on a stage from time to time.
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Jean
Reading Dune and The Player of Games atm.
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Jean
Oh yeah, and finished The Stand. An enjoyable read, but paced horribly and felt like a bit of a waste of time, ultimately.
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Jean
The Player of Games: [smile]
Dune: [biggrin][biggrin][biggrin]

It's very stupid that I'm only getting around to Dune now, but better late than never. I'm even going to have to read at least one sequel, even though I've heard they suck. Do they suck?
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Paquito
Jean wrote:
It's very stupid that I'm only getting around to Dune now, but better late than never. I'm even going to have to read at least one sequel, even though I've heard they suck. Do they suck?


Book 2, Dune Messiah, is very good, and you can consider books 1 and 2 to be a complete story.
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mikevotto
I usually read three books at once - always have...something I picked up from my old man, I think - but I just wrapped up reading Earth Abides for like the twentieth time. One of my favorite books.

The Last Policeman is so far a fun meeting of apocalyptic fiction and a police procedural. It's light, fun, and well-written. So far, so good.

Also just got Sleazoid Express and just scratched the surface of it last night. I have spent the last two or three years reading books revolving around post-war/pre-Disney Times Square and it's amazing it's taken me this long to read this one. Should have it done by the end of the weekend.

Paquito wrote:


Book 2, Dune Messiah, is very good, and you can consider books 1 and 2 to be a complete story.


I second this. Haven't read it since I was younger, but I remember the Dune series providing me with diminished returns after the first two books.
"You want me to salute that pile of walking pus? Salute my ass!" - Captain Rhodes
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briggm
Book thread Moses.
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Moses
briggm wrote:
Book thread Moses.


Thanks, Briggm.
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Putu
Only one book at a time though. Enforced literary monogamy.
That's...not what I meant at all.
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mikevotto
Putu wrote:
Only one book at a time though. Enforced literary monogamy.


Finished up the other two while away on business, and picked up the Day by Day Armegeddon series to read. Knocked the first one out in a day, and I'm almost done on the second one. I hear the third sucks because it strays away from the diary format, but I'm gonna give it a chance. These first two would make good movies though.

I'm not tackling anything too heavy this year, and I've been able to consume a lot more by doing so.
"You want me to salute that pile of walking pus? Salute my ass!" - Captain Rhodes
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briggm
Has anybody read In the Country of Last Things by Paul Auster? I haven't read any of his books, but if I were to read one it'd be this. But only if you say it's good!
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Little Ash
briggm wrote:
Has anybody read In the Country of Last Things by Paul Auster? I haven't read any of his books, but if I were to read one it'd be this. But only if you say it's good!


Years ago I read his trilogy that started with City of Glass (The New York trilogy, now that I looked it up). Mainly got started because of a really interesting graphic novel adaptation of the first.
That I can recommend based off of vague memory. I have not read ItCoLT.
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Mr. Biscuits
I haven't read ItCoLT either (big help I know), but it might help you to know that Paul Auster wrote the script for the 1995 film Smoke, if you've seen that--and you ought to, it's quite good. The New York Trilogy was also good.
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Infinitus Corsair
briggm wrote:
Has anybody read In the Country of Last Things by Paul Auster? I haven't read any of his books, but if I were to read one it'd be this. But only if you say it's good!


I haven't read it either.
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whic
Have any of you read Stephen Florida? I want to talk about it.
nothing.
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kgaard
I'm reading The Count of Monte Cristo. I had forgotten how much fun these Dumbass books are.
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whic
That's not what I asked, kgaard.
nothing.
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Bigwig
Infinitus Corsair wrote:


I haven't read it either.


I haven't either. Good thread.
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kgaard
whic wrote:
That's not what I asked, kgaard.


Oh, I answered your question.
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whic
I just want to talk about the end of Stepen Florida. And I also want to talk about the frogman.
nothing.
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Zuben
briggm wrote:
Has anybody read In the Country of Last Things by Paul Auster? I haven't read any of his books, but if I were to read one it'd be this. But only if you say it's good!


Hey, would this be a good time to bring, again, that I once drove Paul Auster and Coetzee around to various events during a writing festival? They called me by my first name!
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whic
Just finished The People in the Trees. It ripped my guts out and I knew what was coming the entire time.
nothing.
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Moses
I read Annihilation and was genuinely thrilled in parts. That doesn't happen a whole lot because I am heavily medicated these days.
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Flemstar
I finished Candide by Voltaire. It’s short but pretty good. Never a dull moment. Voltaire managed to get a few lols outta me.

I started Birth of our Power by Victor Serge. Haven’t been able to put it down. Dude knew how to write well.
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Unregistered
Waiting for this. His first since World War Z.

[image] 
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Infinitus Corsair
The Heavens by Sandra Newman is wonderful and even more of the moment than it must have seemed when written and published.
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whic

I'm moving this post here because I want to not because Paquito said to. 

I've been reading (listening to audiobooks) my ass off in quarantine. Mostly pulpy stuff or horror because that's what my brain can handle.

Here's my list:

 

-Great Economic Thinkers: Karl Marx: Das Capital - the only audio version my library offered and it was a shitty abridged and annotated version that did give some decent historical context but was very dismissive of text without giving real counter arguments.

-Under the Banner of Heaven, John Krakauer - A great way to gain perspective on the rise of Mormonism and the attitudes of manifest destiny in the American West. Also a horrific true crime story

 

-Zero K, Don DeLillo - A haunting piece of science fiction literature about fathers, sons, legacy, and destiny

 

-Those Across the River, Christopher Buehlman - A page turner with a great sense of place that falls flat once it reveals its central horror. It also thinks it has a lot more to say about race and racism than it actually does

 

-The Changeling, Victor LaValle - I loved this book and it sent me on a huge LaValle kick. It's a messy and creepy modern fairytale about parenthood, mental illness, race, and otherness. It had some pacing issues and a couple groan inducing reveals but it all worked for me.

 

-The Devil in Silver, Victor LaValle - My least favorite LaValle novel. A more ham-fisted story than the rest but I appreciated the One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest influence and ultimately, I loved the protagonist. In spite of the sloppiness, the story did serve his character well.

 

-The Ballad of Black Tom, Victor LaValle - An incredible Lovecraftian cosmic horror novella that succeeds in its attempt to address the racism of its inspiration but also stand on its own as a work of American literature. If you're even slightly into cosmic horror, read this now.

-Big Machine, Victor LaValle - This book felt like an amalgam of all the previous LaValle novels in the best way. The protagonist is one of the best characters I've read and the book does an entertaining and often hilarious job of blending magical realism and horror with some lofty themes.

 

-A People's Future of the United States, Various Authors curated by Victor LaValle - Didn't finish this one. It's a collection of speculative short stories (of varying quality), by a diverse set of authors, that largely deal with post-collapse America. Not the right mood for the current moment.

 

-The Familiar Dark, Amy Engel - A DARK mystery novel set in rural, meth ridden Missouri. I love when an author gets small town America right and Engel nails it. The central mystery is so heartbreaking that it almost lessens the impact of everything that happens later but it's extremely well crafted and earns everything it reveals.

 

-The Roanoke Girls, Amy Engel - I'm going to be haunted by this one for a long time. It's another dark (even darker than the previous) mystery where the main character is both detective and victim. This one takes place in rural Kansas and again, hits the nail on the head. It captures the oppressive dread of a small town summer in a way that I've never experienced in fiction. It's about family dysfunction and sexual abuse, so be warned. But it has a great sprawling, creepy, house as it's centerpiece, which is fun.

 

Not sure what I'm going to read next, I started Libra, another DeLillo novel but I'm not sure that audio is the best format for this one.

Oh, I've also been reading The Chronicles of Narnia to my boys (in the published order). I loved them when I was a kid and I love them now, although I haven't gotten to the really racist bits. Also, my kids barely know who Jesus is, so a lot of the deeper meaning is lost in them. 

 
 




nothing.
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Infinitus Corsair
Couldn't there be a thread specifically for quarantine reading? Idk, just spitballing here.
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whic
I wouldn't want there to be too many active threads in the forum. It would get confusing. We'd lose track. 
nothing.
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Zuben
Whoa, bent to Paquito's will like an absolute bitch! Like a little bitch boy who is not a real man!
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Paquito
Zuben wrote:
Whoa, bent to Paquito's will like an absolute bitch! Like a little bitch boy who is not a real man!


This is problematic. I don't think you understand the impact the term has on female canines. Rabid may have some book recommendations for you.
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Infinitus Corsair
Anybody have a good pool book recommendation?

I'd like a good read, but it doesn't have to have pretensions. Something pulpy or lurid would be welcome--sci-fi or fantasy or horror that is not too stiff or formal. Quick and easy but not dumb.
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Paquito
Anybody have a good pool book recommendation?

I'd like a good read, but it doesn't have to have pretensions. Something pulpy or lurid would be welcome--sci-fi or fantasy or horror that is not too stiff or formal. Quick and easy but not dumb.


Have you checked out the Broken Earth trilogy yet? (N.K. Jemisin). I'd call it sci-fi fantasy. The first book is the best, it's good throughout, and the third book lands the ending in a satisfying way.
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Infinitus Corsair
Paquito wrote:


Have you checked out the Broken Earth trilogy yet? (N.K. Jemisin). I'd call it sci-fi fantasy. The first book is the best, it's good throughout, and the third book lands the ending in a satisfying way.


No, but I hear them discussed a good bit. I will give it a shot.
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Detrimental

[_SX348_BO1,204,203,200_] 


As you said years ago in chat, I only like books with pictures with them.  
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Wreck
Anybody have a good pool book recommendation?

I'd like a good read, but it doesn't have to have pretensions. Something pulpy or lurid would be welcome--sci-fi or fantasy or horror that is not too stiff or formal. Quick and easy but not dumb.


Red Rising series by Pierce Brown. Or The Stormlight Archives by Brandon Sanderson.

Edit: Ok the second rec is not what you are looking for, at over 1000 pages for first book. But you should read it at some point. First rec is exactly what you are looking for.
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whic
Anybody have a good pool book recommendation?

I'd like a good read, but it doesn't have to have pretensions. Something pulpy or lurid would be welcome--sci-fi or fantasy or horror that is not too stiff or formal. Quick and easy but not dumb.

Yeah, hang on. Let me write up a post summarizing 11 or 12 books real quick. 
nothing.
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Zuben
I didnt like the first Broken Earth book that much. There is something there that I'm not getting, because it's a critical darling. If I was recommending some poolside sci fi I'd probably go with The Expanse.
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Infinitus Corsair
whic wrote:

Yeah, hang on. Let me write up a post summarizing 11 or 12 books real quick. 


You didn't say if any of them were good pool books. I don't want to read about fucking Mormonism in the pool.

It occurs to me that a pool book is basically the same as a beach read. Or a book you buy in an airport bookstore. If that helps. Disturbed about Zuben's Broken Earth dissent, but The Expanse is like 8 million pages.
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Wreck
I would second Zuben's dissent on Broken Earth, and I read all three.
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Detrimental
I'm like serious about my suggestion, IC. Don't read it around people though as it contains nudity.
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Infinitus Corsair
Detrimental wrote:
I'm like serious about my suggestion, IC. Don't read it around people though as it contains nudity.


I appreciate the suggestion, Det, but I am talking about grown-up books.
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Detrimental


I appreciate the suggestion, Det, but I am talking about grown-up books.


Children book's don't depict people almost getting raped by horses, IC.
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Infinitus Corsair
Detrimental wrote:


Children book's don't depict people almost getting raped by horses, IC.


I appreciate the hard sell.
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